Results Under a Mixed Member Proportional System

Guiding Principle: Legitimacy

Ultimately, it is up to voters to decide whether a Mixed Member Proportional system is a legitimate choice for the province and whether it better reflects the values of Ontario than our current system does. The system we have designed retains the strong link with local members that Ontarians value. It also gives voters more choice and will produce fairer election results. These features of the new system, coupled with our belief that it will produce stable and effective governments, led the Assembly to recommend a Mixed Member Proportional system to the people of Ontario.

In a Mixed Member Proportional system, the share of seats a party wins closely reflects its share of the party vote. Parties keep all the local seats they win, even if they win more local seats than their share of the party vote gives them.

If parties don’t have enough local members elected to match their share of the vote, they get a “top-up” of seats in the legislature. These seats are filled by list members elected by voters across the province through their party votes. The list seats are used to compensate for the lack of proportionality in the election of local members.

The table below shows how this is done.

Party A received 45% of the party vote and should therefore receive about 45% of the seats in the legislature. In this example, it won 42% of the seats through the election of local members, so it is compensated with enough seats for list members elected province-wide to bring its total representation in the legislature up to 45%.

Party B received 30% of the party vote but won 23% of the seats locally. It is compensated with list seats to reflect its share of the party vote.

Party C received 16% of the party vote but won 5% of the seats locally. It is compensated with list seats to reflect its share of the party vote.

Party D received 7% of the party vote, but did not elect any local members. Its representation in the legislature comprises only list members.

Party E received 2% of the party vote and did not elect any local members. Because its percentage of the party vote was below the 3% threshold, it does not qualify for list seats.

Compensation for lack of Proportionality